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Posts Tagged ‘Indian Runner Ducks’

1

We transported the ducks to the pond the other day.

You’d think they’d like the thought of getting wet, of splish-splashing and blowing bubbles under water.

2

In fact, we have to corral them, corner them, catch them and carry them to the water’s edge because they don’t go to the pond on their own.

(It’s because they think they’re chickens, in fact, but we try to keep that quiet.)

Once at the water and in the water, they behave like proper ducks, and emerge later all shiny and fluffed up.

Unlike chicken’s feathers, ducks’ feathers are oily and attract the dust and grime of daily life, much like our vehicles.

3

A visit to the duck-wash takes care of that.

Er, what’s that in the corner?

4

The ducks studiously ignore the new kid.

“We can’t see you, we can’t see you.”

5

Somebody else is curious, however.

6

One seeking, one knowing.

7

He waits, watching, not going to spoil it for her.

8

Comprehension!

9

Going to check this out.

10

She’d never seen a decoy before and couldn’t imagine why someone would make a toy so life-like and yet so gray and unattractive.

11

12

13

A great couple of moments of exploration!

14

Meanwhile, a certain trio emerges from its icy bath and prepares to depart the spa.

15

One up.

16

Two up.

17

And three.

All accounted for.

18

Briskly refreshed, they sally forth, anticipating the delights of  cracked corn and crushed wheat.

19

“The road to the house of a friend is never far.”

— from my friend Sigi’s entranceway

20

There’s no place like home, there’s no place like home…


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Stand by me

1

These Indian Runner ducks we have possess no individuality.

Plenty of personality but nothing unique to set them apart from the flock.

2

Our chickens, on the other foot hand (sorry), distinctly differentiate themselves from one another. Bossy, timid, tame, skittish — every hen and rooster has a distinct manner of behaviour within the flock. And as they all look different, it’s easy to tell who’s who.

3

Not so with the quackers.

They all look different but it doesn’t matter. They think, move, eat and waddle as one giant peer group.

4

I put out a pan of water. One dunked her head. Another dunked her head. A third dunked his head.

5

One started preening, rubbing her head on her back. The other two followed suit.

And it doesn’t take a lot of water to make them happy. A pan of water works, a puddle of water works, dew on the morning grass works, freshly fallen snow works. We have a pond but at present the pond has no appeal.

6

It’s a ducky-see ducky-do kind of world.

7 duck 2legs

And they’re not competitive (Now, chickens? They’re competitive) as in, “I can stand on one leg which twisting my head backwards on to my back. Can you?”

No. It’s more like, “Hey, Doreen! Check out this new move from yoga! Twist your neck twice and put your head upside down under your wing and hold your breath.”

“Oh, honey, you’re so cute. Let’s go get a bite somewhere, okay?”

8

Always together, always supportive. Remind me of my aunt and uncle. A nice thought.

9

And now, a nice shake, a shiver from beak to tail, a rustle and a ruffle of feathers, a shimmy and a fluff and ahhhh.

10

On their way again.

“Come on, Doreen. Let’s go!”

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